Settling Tax Debt With an IRS Offer in Compromise

Settling Tax Debt With an IRS Offer in Compromise

An offer in compromise (OIC) is an agreement between a taxpayer and the Internal Revenue Service that settles a taxpayer’s tax liabilities for less than the full amount owed. That’s the good news. The bad news is that not everyone can use this option to settle tax debt; the IRS rejected nearly 60 percent of taxpayer-requested offers in compromise. If you owe money to the IRS and wonder if an IRS offer in compromise is the answer, here’s what you need to know.

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Small Business: Understanding Payroll Expenses

Small Business: Understanding Payroll Expenses

Federal law requires most employers to withhold federal taxes from their employees’ wages. Whether you’re a small business owner who is just starting or one who has been in business for a while – ready to hire an employee or two – here is what you should know about withholding, reporting, and paying employment taxes.

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Tax Tips for June 2021

Tax Tips for June 2021

Click on the links below to jump to each section in this article: How to Check the Status of Your Tax Refund Payment for Refundable Child Tax Credit Starts July 15 HSA Limits Increase for 2022 What is an Economic Impact Notice? Tips for Students with a Summer Job   How to Check the Status of Your Tax Refund   Taxpayers can start checking their tax refund status within 24 hours after receiving an e-filed return. The easiest and most convenient way to do this is by using the Where's My Refund? Tool on the IRS website. The tool also provides a personalized refund date after the return is processed and a refund is approved. There are two ways to access the Where's My Refund? Tool - visiting IRS.gov or downloading the IRS2Go app. To use the tool, taxpayers will need the following...

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What are Estimated Tax Payments?

What are Estimated Tax Payments?

Estimated tax is the method used to pay tax on income that is not subject to withholding. This includes income from self-employment, interest, dividends, alimony, and rent and gains from the sale of assets, prizes, and awards. You also may have to pay an estimated tax if the amount of income tax being withheld from your salary, pension, or other income is not enough. Here's what you should know about estimated tax payments: Filing and Paying Estimated Taxes Both individuals and business owners may need to file and pay estimated taxes, which are paid quarterly. The first estimated tax payment of the year is ordinarily due on the same day as your federal tax return is due. In 2021, however, the first estimated tax payment was due on April 15, but tax returns were not due until May 17. If...

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Integra International Audit & Accounting Alert – June 2021 (Issue 5)

The rapidly expanding scope and accessibility of technological advances in all aspects of society continue to spread pervasively. The accounting profession is no exception to the trend. A new report from the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) and Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada (CPA Canada) explores how the profession is favorably situated to serve in this dynamic arena, provided that essential technical skills keep pace. This issue highlights the report, along with guidance from the AICPA aimed at accounting and auditing of digital assets.

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Expat Compliance With US Tax Filing Obligations

Expat Compliance With US Tax Filing Obligations

Taxpayers who relinquish citizenship without complying with their U.S. tax obligations are subject to the significant tax consequences of the U.S. expatriation tax regime. If you're an expat who has relinquished - or intends to relinquish - your U.S. citizenship but still has U.S. tax filing obligations (including owing back taxes), you'll be relieved to know there are IRS procedures in place that allow you to come into compliance and receive relief for any back taxes owed. Let's take a look: Background Intended for anyone who has relinquished or intends to relinquish their United States (U.S.) citizenship, the Relief Procedures for Certain Former Citizens apply to taxpayers who want to come into compliance with their U.S. income tax and reporting obligations and avoid being taxed as a...

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Tips to Help You Figure Out if Your Gift is Taxable

Tips to Help You Figure Out if Your Gift is Taxable

If you've given money or property to someone as a gift, you may owe federal gift tax, but in many cases, you will not. For example, there is usually no tax if you make a gift to your spouse or a charity. If you make a gift to someone else, the gift tax usually does not apply until the value of the gifts you give that person exceeds the annual exclusion for the year. In 2021, you can give any amount up to $15,000 per person per year with no gift tax liability. However, gifts exceeding that amount are counted against a gift tax exemption of $11,700,000 and are subject to gift tax. At your death, these gifts could become your taxable estate (with credit for gift tax paid). Education-related Gifts Many grandparents and parents contribute to the cost of their child or grandchild attending...

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